Category Archives: Culture & Economy

HyperKult XXV: Audio Panel

This year’s HyperKult at Leuphana University in Lüneburg was the last instance in a string of 25 extraordinary conferences. They were extraordinary because they provided room for discussions around the computability of cultural practice away from the bustling struggle for impact and ratings that we experience in the CHI community, for example. With the historic town of Lüneburg as the backdrop, discussions were usually able to slow down and get more thorough as they could be continued over beers by the river. However, this is over now, at least in the form of HyperKult. Aptly named “Shutdown”, this year’s conference was focused on the notion of closure, of endings, in the context of technology that is designed for always-on operation. At the same time, it also provided an opportunity to look back and reflect on the topics that had been in the focus over the years. I was invited to participate in a panel discussion moderated by Rolf Grossmann, and we were joined by Michael Harenberg from HKB Bern. My part concentrated on aspects of interfaces in audio production and performance as they changed over the course of the years, and how this was reflected in scientific and artistic contributions at the HyperKult conferences. The videos of the talks and the panel will be available soon in the HyperKult archive.

GiantSteps Panel at Sónar 2014

On Thursday, June 12, I will be part of a panel discussion on musical knowledge in technological innovation. The panel is part of the Sónar Festival 2014 in Barcelona. It is organized by the GiantSteps EU-funded research project (http://www.giantsteps-project.eu/), in which Native Instrument is involved as a consortium partner.
Panel website Post at GiantSteps

CTM MusicMakers Hacklab Conversation

At this year’s MusicMakers Hacklab during Club Transmediale, we discuss how the concept of “the user” shapes how we think about future features and interfaces of creative instruments. How do we construct our notions of the musicians who will want to use our designs? Do the Hacklab participants follow radically different approaches than a company like Native Instruments?

Join the Conversation!

CDR Maschine Special

CDR Berlin

CDR Berlin will host a Maschine Special on October 10, offering a workshop session with a focus on the work and the thoughts behind Maschine Studio. I will get a chance to answer questions on the CDR stage. Afterwards, there will be a workshop with Mouse On Mars, and they will – among other things – talk about the WretchUp app I helped to put together, and which is nearing its release (finally!). Should be a nice evening with friends!
CDR Preamble with a short Q&A
Event website with registration

WretchUp by Mouse On Mars Crowdfunding Campaign

WretchUp interface, as used by Mouse On Mars.

Mouse on Mars together with Peter Kirn of Create Digital Music have launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to turn one of the Pd patches I developed for them into a full iOS and, potentially, Android app. I am not part of the campaign or development effort, but of course looking forward to the outcome.

Besides developing the app, this project will also contribute to the porting of the great Rjlib set of Pd abstractions for use in other iOS projects. The patch itself and all code that is not protected by Apple will be made available as open source.

In addition to the benefits of the Pd patch becoming an app and the Rjlib becoming more accessible, this is also a highly interesting social experiment. The discussion on Create Digital Music is a great example of how value is being negotiated in today’s economy, while at the same time, several funders of the campaign have invested more than they were asked for in the respective packages they chose.

Read more:
Campaign Website
Create Digital Music
Rjlib

Dynamics of “Vivisystems”

Although Kevin Kelly’s famous book “Out of Control” was published back in 1994, it still holds plenty of topics that are worth to be brought to the table in all different kinds of discourses on systems. In addition, it provides a broad spectrum of ideas for computer models of complex systems. The author has kindly made the full book available for free on his website.
Book page

Strangely enough, although the author describes the benefits of biological and technological coevolution, he then ventures to favor technological taking over biological evolution by means of genetic and bioengineering. This is where I’d disagree, as it seems illogical, especially in the context of the book itself, to deliberately give up biological assets such as proven sustainability in conjunction with emergence, and fallback mechanisms that can help minimize risk for all parties involved.